Nonostante Le Proteste Dei Leader Ebraici Europei, L'orologio Appartenuto A Hitler È Stato Messo All'asta Negli Stati Uniti.

August 1, 2022

Gli oggetti non fanno altro che dare manforte a coloro che idealizzano ciò che il partito nazista rappresentava o offrono agli acquirenti la possibilità di stuzzicare un ospite o una persona cara con un oggetto appartenente a un assassino genocida e ai suoi sostenitori", ha scritto il rabbino Menachem Margolin, presidente dell'Associazione ebraica europea (EJA) con sede a Bruxelles, in una lettera cofirmata da 34 leader delle comunità ebraiche in Europa – scrive Yossi Lempkowicz.

Nonostante le proteste dei leader ebraici europei, un orologio d'oro appartenuto a Hitler è stato venduto da una casa d'aste americana per oltre 1 milione di euro.

L'orologio Huber presenta il disegno di una svastica e le iniziali A H. È stato acquistato da un offerente anonimo.

L'asta si è svolta venerdì, nonostante 34 leader ebrei europei avessero chiesto alla casa d'aste Alexander Historical Auctions di Chesapeake City, nel Maryland, di annullare l'asta.

Tra gli altri oggetti nazisti messi all'asta c'erano un collare per cani appartenuto al terrier di Eva Braun, carta igienica della Wehrmacht, posate e bicchieri di champagne di alte personalità naziste.

Il presidente della casa d'aste, Bill Panagopulos, ha respinto le proteste. Ha detto: "Quello che vendiamo è una prova criminale, per quanto insignificante. È una prova tangibile e reale che Hitler e i nazisti hanno vissuto, perseguitato e ucciso decine di milioni di persone. Distruggere o impedire in qualsiasi modo l'esposizione o la protezione di questo materiale è un crimine contro la storia".

Ma i leader ebraici, che hanno inviato una lettera alla casa d'aste per condannare la vendita, hanno respinto l'affermazione: "Gli oggetti non fanno altro che dare manforte a coloro che idealizzano ciò che il partito nazista rappresentava o offrono agli acquirenti la possibilità di stuzzicare un ospite o una persona cara con un oggetto appartenente a un assassino genocida e ai suoi sostenitori", ha scritto il rabbino Menachem Margolin, presidente dell'Associazione ebraica europea (EJA) con sede a Bruxelles, nella lettera cofirmata da 34 leader delle comunità ebraiche europee.

Ha aggiunto: "La vendita di questi oggetti è un'abiezione. La maggior parte dei lotti esposti non ha alcun valore storico intrinseco. In effetti, ci si può solo interrogare sulle motivazioni di chi li acquista. L'Europa ha sofferto enormemente a causa dell'ideologia perversa e assassina del partito nazista. Milioni di persone sono morte per preservare i valori di libertà che oggi diamo per scontati, tra cui quasi mezzo milione di americani. Il nostro continente è disseminato di fosse comuni commemorative e di siti di campi di sterminio".

Negli ultimi anni, l'Associazione Ebraica Europea ha protestato contro diverse aste di oggetti nazisti.

Alexander Historical Auctions aveva già affrontato un rimprovero simile per vendite precedenti, tra cui una che presentava i diari personali del noto criminale di guerra nazista Josef Mengele.

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