In Berlin, the 93-year-old Holocaust survivor by the name of Emil Farkash testifies against the notorious Josef Schutz.

November 5, 2021

In Berlin, the 93-year-old Holocaust survivor by the name of Emil Farkash testifies against the notorious Josef Schutz. Mr. Schutz is a 100-year-old charged with complicity in the murder of 3,518 prisoners when he worked as a warden at the Sachsenhausen concentration camp in 1942-1945.
The European Jewish Association applauds and admires the courage of Mr. Farkash in attending the trial of the charged individual.
Moreover, the EJA has extended their hand to offer any kind of assistance to Mr. Farkash. However, he politely declined and noted that he is receiving sufficient assistance from the German government. On behalf of the family, we would like to thank Adv. Thomas Walther and Dr. Efraim Zuroff for their support.
Once again, the EJA stands firm in its stance to seek out justice against criminals associated with the Holocaust.

Additional Articles

Suspect in murder of British lawmaker named as Ali Harbi Ali

The suspect, who is yet to be formally charged, is a 25-year-old British citizen of Somali extraction

British media on Saturday reported the name of the suspect in the stabbing murder of Member of Parliament David Amess as Ali Harbi Ali.

According to Sky News, the arrested suspect, who is yet to be formally charged, is a 25-year-old British citizen of Somali extraction.

It is understood that he was not previously known to the security services.

Amess was stabbed in a Methodist church on Friday during a meet-and-greet with constituents, and died at the scene.

 Read More:

https://www.i24news.tv/en/news/international/europe/1634416786-suspect-in-murder-of-british-lawmaker-named-as-ali-harbi-ali

EJA thanks Lithuania for adopting the working definition of anti-Semitism

EJA Chairman Rabbi Menachem Margolin wrote a letter of thanks to Lithuanian Foreign Minister Linas Linkevičius after the Minister made the decision that Lithuania will endorse and adopt the international definition of anti‑Semitism by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA). “Anti‑Semitism has absolutely no place – neither in Lithuania, nor in other parts of the world”, said Mr Linkevicius as he announced the move.


 
 

Austrian Initiative Promoting Holocaust Education in Awake of WWII Victory Anniversary

EJA had received the following letter from the Federal Chancellery of Austria:

Dear Sir/Madame,

I hope this message finds you well. 

The 8th of May 1945 marked the end of the Second World War in Europe and the end of the Nazi reign of terror in Austria. While looking back at the darkest chapter in Austria‘s history, the 8th of May also represents a day of liberation and joy.

Chancellor Sebastian Kurz and Vice Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache spoke at today’s commemorative event, emphasizing that remembrance must be followed by concrete action. Austria has a special responsibility in the fight against antisemitism and in safeguarding Jewish life in Europe, Israel and in the rest of the world. The first ever agreement of the EU countries to decisively fight antisemitism which Austria managed to reach during its Presidency, was an important step into the right direction.

“My generation is probably the last one that is able to speak to holocaust survivors. In this context, I fully support the proposal to give all secondary students in Austria the possibility to visit the Mauthausen memorial at least once in their lifetime,” so the Chancellor.

Vice-Chancellor Heinz-Christian Strache also underlined Austria’s commitment to remembrance on such a significant day: “The Shoah was the most horrible and vicious manifestation of the Nazi terror regime. I bow my head to all those who became victims to this gruesome and cruel time in our history.”

Austria has been cooperating actively with the memorial Yad Vashem over the past decades. Since the year 2000, around 800 Austrian teachers participated in seminars/courses at the memorial to improve the curricula of Austrianstudents, and last year, as Austrian Federal Government, we contributed 1 Million Euros to the construction of the Shoah Heritage Campus. 

To further strengthen this relationship, today Chancellor Sebastian Kurz has signed on behalf of the Austrian Federal Government an archival agreement with Yad Vashem. The agreement will give historians from Austria and Israel the opportunity to access their respective archives and conduct their research. We are firmly committed to make sure that no individual story will ever be forgotten.

Feel free to come back to me at any time in case of further inquiries or comments.

Kind Regards,
Peter Launsky-Tieffenthal

Federal Chancellery of the Republic of Austria

Spokesperson of the Federal Government

Ambassador

Peter Launsky-Tieffenthal

EJA Chairman, Rabbi Menachem Margolin had reply to the letter:
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A special message for Shavuot from Chief Rabbi Jacobs.

Shavuot starts on Thursday evening. For those of you lucky enough to understand dutch, we are pleased to share with you this deeply inspiring message from our esteemed EJA Board Member, Chief Rabbi Jacobs from the Netherlands, for those of you that don’t, we had it translated for you. Wishing you all a Blessed and Happy Shavuot Holiday.
Chief Rabbi Binyomin Jacobs shares his vision in these complicated times from the synagogue in Amersfoort.
Judaism has many traditions and laws.
But there is one law that remarkably doesn’t fall under the 613 commands and prohibitions.
It just doesn’t exist and that is the prohibition on being depressed.
What I mean is there are people that see everything darkly. They see everything in a negative way and don’t look for the positives. They always focus on the negative side. So why is there no law against this?
The answer to that question is, being depressed is not a violation but it stands higher (or lower) in a way than a regular law. Because it leads to the biggest of violations.
This perspective looks at everything that can go wrong. It’s like only looking at the negative potential side-effects of medicines and forgeting that the purpose of the medicine is to cure.
Such a way of life is not only one violation but is also the root for a lot of misery in mental health.
And because body and mind are connected, it also has effects on your body.
A negative and depressed attitude is a source of misery, mental and physical.
I wrote a column once about a tightrope walker. A tightrope walker shouldn’t look only upwards and blindly trust in the Eternal that all ‘it will be alright.‘ But equally only to look down into the abyss is not good.
There is a happy medium. A balance between up and down. Otherwise the tightrope walker will never make it to the other side.
In a way we are all tightrope walkers. All the time we need to find a balance between the Eternal and the fact that there is indeed an abyss.
Another point: A man grows up in the jungle. He knows nothing of the civilised world.
His view never got further than the trees and the jungle. His jungle. This man gets lost and arrives in a city.
He looks at everything. He walks around surprised. He walks into the door of a big building into the hallway, walks up the stars and goes unto the balcony. Below him he sees a large room. In that room men and women walking around with face masks on. On the wall he sees tools, saws, drills and more intruments.
In the middle of the hall stands a high long table. On that table lies a white sheet. Under that sheet a human foot stick out. A nod is given, and some men and women start to cut into it.
Blood sprays out and our man from the Jungle passes out. He has never seen something so sadistic. Of course, he ended up in the operating room of a hospital. The person on the table, in the hospital bed, was sick and was being cured by the doctor and the nurses. Our man sees only the painful operation. He does not know the context that that the patient was sick and is being cured by this operation.
Life is like an operation. There is something before and something after. But if we only witness the operation then that’s the only thing we see. What there was before and what comes after, removes itself completely from our vision.
More than ever, today we all feel that we are undergoing an operation.
Is it a punishment? A reward? Meaningful? Meaningless? It’s always good to keep a mirror in front of yourself. But to firmly embed yourself into feelings of guilt, putting yourself into a depressed condition, that should never happen.
We cannot understand life like our man from the Jungle.
Serve G-d with joy. Are we able to do that? Or a better question: can I do that?
A parable is told of 2 strong cool guys (someone like me). Both are standing at the foot of a mountain. Both have an empty burlap sack on their shoulders. The contest can start.
The starting gun is fired and both guys need to, while climbing, fill their sacks with rocks.
After 3 hours they have a same amount of rocks in their sacks. Both climbed to the same height. But one is pale and cannot clime any higher.
The other is singing with joy and walks with big steps. How is this possible? That one is so heavily burdened but the other does not feel it? Both have the same health and strength. Both have the same amount of rocks in their sacks. But the guy that cannot climb a single step further thinks he is carrying kilos of stupid rocks. The more rocks he is collecting, it gets heavier and heavier.
His buddy knows that it is not just rocks. Its precious stones and diamonds. The more diamonds he gets into his sack, the lighter and lighter it gets.
How do I choose to look at all the things that I am enduring in my life?
When I’m speaking to a lot of people as a rabbi, I learn a lot. People are in situations that are heavier than mine. But they take every load as a diamond. I learn from their strength and self-control.
They hold a mirror in front of me.
That is Judaism.
To learn from someone else.
And it’s also Judaism to see the heavy load not as it is.
It’s also Judaism that when you notice an unexpected a shortcoming in someone else, you are aware that it also can be present in you.
If you did not know that this shortcoming was what it is, you would not recognize it in yourself.
And at the same time, alertness.
Alertness of the rise in antisemitism that is far from vanished and vanquished.
Our minister of Justice and Security is also Minister of Worship.
And when I spoke to him about restarting our worship, he warned me about the lone wolf.
Especially during the pandemic. But it is also, alertness to the physical rules that should protect us against that terrible virus.
When we can go to shul, the church or the mosque, we shouldn’t just trust that everything will come from above.
Because when that tightrope walker only looks up, he won’t make it.
On Thursday we start the holiday of Shavuot. The Jewish people stood as one at the foot of the Sinai to receive the 10 commandments, the 613 mitzvot and the Torah in its totality.
They saw G-d. There was something in common and that brought them together. There was unanimity. For division, fights and tensions there was no room.
In this time of Coronavirus, it is not only the Jewish people that have something in common, but the whole of humanity: a common enemy. From it we should liberate ourselves. But it’s an enemy of everyone, without any form of discrimination.
Let us pray that that enemy will be beaten in our days, exterminated and that the unanimity that the virus has made, will stay.
May there be speedily in our days eternal shalom – peace – for the whole of humanity, real peace for everyone.
You can hear the words of Rabbi Jacobs in dutch HERE

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